How To Stamp Using Fan Patterned Stamps

Fan textures are usually composed of brick for cobble textures arranged in a semi-circle patterns. There can have a rounded concave or pointed convex. With the concave bottom, the top of next texture will center nicely behind the next. Convex textures will sit offset of the previous row.  Fan patterns create beautiful impressions reminiscent of European streets.

  • It’s always a good idea to lay out your tools and get organized ahead of time.
  • Place and finish the slab as you normally would.
  • After you’ve finished the slab and are waiting for it to firm up, start prepping your tools.
  • Use Brickform Antique Release and Liquid Release to protect your tools and the concrete while stamping.
  • Apply Antique Release to the bottom of the stamps prior to stamping. Apply it to the concrete at a rate of 800 to 1000 square feet per bucket. Too much release will result in a false imprint while too little will cause the texture tools to stick to the concrete.
  • Start by using corresponding texture skins around the edge of the slab and in hard to reach areas.
  • Use Brickform Touch-Up Wheels to help create crisp, clean grout lines.

How To Stamp Using Brick Textures

Cobble and brick pattern stamps are common finishes for a variety of applications – including streetscapes, walk paths, and patios. They provide a vintage appearance that works well in old areas and new construction alike. Failure to master placement of these textures, however, can lead to a cheesy, cartoonish look. Watch this video to see how to best stamp using cobble and brick stamp patterns.

  • It’s always a good idea to lay out your tools and get organized ahead of time.
  • Place and finish the slab as you normally would.
  • After you’ve finished the slab and are waiting for it to firm up, start prepping your tools.
  • Use Brickform Antique Release and Liquid Release to protect your tools and the concrete while stamping.
  • Apply Antique Release to the bottom of the stamps prior to stamping. Apply it to the concrete at a rate of 800 to 1000 square feet per bucket. Too much release will result in a false imprint while too little will cause the texture tools to stick to the concrete.
  • When stamping, make sure your first tool is lined up perfectly square.
  • For easier stamping, consider cutting a tool in half to use at the edge of the slab.

Stamp Placement Videos

Stamp Placement Videos

If you want to be successful when stamping concrete, it is important to be familiar with the layout and fit of the texturing tools. Improperly fitted tools lead to squeeze ups, sloppy grout lines, and generally poor texture. Even if you fit the tools properly, unfamiliarity with the textures will make the process slower, reduce the quality of the finished product, and make the process more difficult.

Todd Rose Presents at Concrete Decor Show

Todd Rose Presents at Concrete Decor Show

Todd Rose, Solomon Colors Area Manager and training guru, will present two educational courses at the Concrete Decor Show. He will also be available at Solomon Colors/Brickform Booth #308, as well Area Manager Ross Urshan.

Crete and Brews: How Concrete Suits Breweries, Bars, and More

Crete and Brews: How Concrete Suits Breweries, Bars, and More

Concrete and beer are a match made in heaven! More specifically, concrete is a good choice for flooring and décor in breweries, pubs, and bars. Concrete offers a combination of durability, serviceability, and aesthetic that makes it especially attractive for breweries, wineries, and all manners of watering holes. 

It All Comes Down To Sealer

It All Comes Down To Sealer

Sealers are the unsung heroes of the decorative concrete world. You and your clients will fret over choosing just the right textures, patterns, and colors. But how much time do you spend considering the sealer? Do your clients even know about this step?

Train to Win at Decorative Concrete

Train to Win at Decorative Concrete

There’s nothing quite like some good, old fashioned hands-on training. We host Contractor Education Seminars every year in Springfield, IL and Rialto, CA during the Spring and Fall seasons. These training programs offer a comprehensive look at core decorative concrete skills such as finishing and placement, stamping, staining, and sealing.

Decorative Concrete in the Basement: A Solid Foundation For Your Business

Decorative Concrete in the Basement: A Solid Foundation For Your Business

Patios and driveways may make up the meat and potatoes of your business. But what about other opportunities? Consider basements as your next avenue for growth. Read on to discover why it could be in your best interest to start selling clients on the benefits of decorative concrete finishes in their basement.

Exposed Aggregate Isn’t Just For Pools Anymore

Exposed Aggregate Isn’t Just For Pools Anymore

Exposed aggregate is a versatile decorative finish. When you focus on the right characteristics and features, it is an easy sell that will leave you and your clients happy. You will find that exposed aggregate has a place in nearly any concrete application, not just pools.  

Concrete Industry Steps Up For Houston

Hurricane Harvey devastated the gulf coast, specifically impacting Houston, Texas. Thousands of people have been impacted. Large swaths of Houston flooded, displacing thousands of people. Dozens of people in the area have perished as a result of the storm and flooding. The gulf coast region is desperately in need of aid.

2017 Decorative Concrete Fair in Review

2017 Decorative Concrete Fair in Review

We, at Solomon Colors, could not be more pleased with how the Decorative Concrete Fair turned out. Thank you to all of our trainers and presenters. Thank you to the supporting vendors and exhibitors: Concrete Network, Concrete Contractor, Concrete Décor, Kraft Tool, Blastrac, Pullman Ermator, Concrete Cares. And a big thank you to everyone who broke away from their busy schedules to attend. We hope to see you all at the next Decorative Concrete Fair!

Liquid vs Powder Release

Liquid vs Powder Release

A release agent is necessary whenever stamping concrete. Without it, the texture tools will stick to the concrete. This leads to wear and tear on the tool and, more importantly, damage to the stamped concrete. Release agents are absolutely vital to a satisfactory textured concrete surface.

Premium Living in the Great Outdoors

Summer is here. That means grilling, pool parties, and more time spent in the great outdoors. Many families will practically live outdoors, turning their backyard into their primary living space. That’s why premium outdoor living spaces are becoming more popular around the country. Homeowners are demanding that their backyard become as comfortable as their living room. Here’s how you can help them out.

Premium Patios and Pool Decks

Outdoor living spaces are more important to family life and entertaining. Simple gray pads that were once the standard patio are no longer acceptable. Homeowners and their guests are looking for something nicer. A decorative patio and/or pool deck will serve as the base for any outdoor installation.

Use stains, on their own or in conjunction with other finishes, to add variety and color. Stains are especially useful because they can be used on new and old concrete. You can use stains to easily upgrade the appearance of an existing, plain gray patio. Refresh older decorative surfaces by highlighting with stain. Stains can add important variation, highlights, and color to a newly cured patio, too.

Texture is vital to a premium concrete patio. When selecting texture, the opportunities are endless. Different combinations of stamps and seamless skins can yield breathtaking results. Surround a medallion stamp with a radius to create a natural focal point. Borders and bands with different textures are a great way to break up repeating patterns and obscure sawcuts.

Exposed aggregate is a classic finish that has been regaining popularity over the years. It is especially useful on pool decks because it creates a non-slip surface while remaining attractive. Exposed aggregate finishes can also combine with other textures, finishes, and colors. Use exposed aggregate bands and borders with stamped textures. Stain your exposed aggregate finishes for more variation.

Restoration

Restoration projects are an excellent opportunity to upgrade. Use decorative overlays to obscure blemishes and improve appearance after repairs are made. Microtoppings and spray deck overlays can be stenciled and trowel textured for simple, attractive finishes. Use stampable overlays to create more detailed textures. Of course, most overlays can be stained just like concrete.

Outdoor Kitchens

Name one summer event that doesn’t have some form of food or drink involved. When people get together, the food and beverages flow. The outdoor kitchen has evolved beyond a simple grill and cooler full of ice. Concrete, as durable and versatile as it is, has made functional outdoor kitchens more attainable than ever before.

Before you begin designing and building the outdoor kitchen, consider what appliances and features are to be included. Will it just be a grill and sink? Will there also be a refrigerator, storage cabinets, or dishwasher? Make sure each of these are accounted for in the design, electrical hookups, and plumbing.

The concrete countertop is the most important part of the outdoor kitchen. It sets the visual tone and is subjected to the most use, abuse, and weather. Concrete is a superior choice for outdoor countertops because it can be formed into most any shape with nearly any color. Use a special countertop mix for maximum performance. Form liners can be used to impart text on the edges of the concrete, mimicking stone and other natural materials. Concrete countertops can be stained or colored to match your design and tastes unlike granite and other common natural materials. Make sure the countertop is ground smooth and properly sealed.

Firepits

Who needs television when you have a cozy fire? Bonfires and roasting fires are central to the outdoor experience once the sun starts to set. When constructing a firepit, hearth or outdoor fireplace, concrete offers stellar options.

When you first start planning, there are a few things to consider. Will it be a gas-fed fire? If so, access to natural gas lines or propane needs to be safe and feasible. From where does the homeowner want the fire to be viewable or accessible? Often, it’s a good idea to place the fire near a spa, dining area, or with a view from the indoor living space. You will also want to make sure the fire installation has seating and social areas nearby. Safety should always be consideration number one.

When designing and building the firepit, hearth, or fireplace, make sure all materials are suitable for heat exposure. Some concrete mixes may contain aggregates not suitable for fire exposure, for example. It is also important to determine whether a firepit, fireplace, or first accent is best. Firepits, for example, are best for larger social groups and entertaining while fireplaces are best for smaller, more intimate groups.

Typically, the firepit or fireplace itself tends to be made from heat-resistant masonry or stone with a decorative concrete patio surrounding it. Precast concrete bowls, boxes, and rings have gotten popular as well. Consider a colored and stained concrete apron or coping around the top of a masonry or stone firepit. This provides a durable ledge to prop up feet, sit, or rest food and drinks while complimenting the surrounding concrete patio.

Water Features

 Especially for premium outdoor living spaces, water features are a nice addition to add motion, life, and vibrancy. They can be standalone fountains, feeders for ponds, or worked into pools. Some of the most common design elements are stones and boulders, going for a naturalistic waterfall motif. But anything is possible if it works with the overall them of the outdoor space. Just make sure your plumbing and drainage are suitable!

For intricate designs often found in water features, a carved vertical mix is ideal. First, you will want to frame in the feature using a wood or metal structure. Make sure it will be able to support the weight of the cementitious vertical mix, pumps, and water lines. You should also be aware of environmental concerns, weather, and drainage. Once the rough structure is constructed, skin it and install a lathe and/or scratch coat to hold the vertical mix. Let your creativity run wild when texturing and carving the vertical mix. Vertical stamps are available to impart texture, but you can always hand carve and texture. Make sure to stain the cured vertical mix with a water based stain, then seal, for a realistic and attractive finish.

Outdoor living spaces are a growing market full of opportunity. When tied into landscaping and overall home design, an outdoor living space vastly improves the usability and hominess of a property. Decorative – colored, textured, and stained – concrete should prominently work into any outdoor living area. Due to its durability and decorative potential, concrete is ideal and should be heavily utilized.

The Contractor’s Guide to Troubleshooting Integral Color

The Contractor’s Guide to Troubleshooting Integral Color

Even the best laid plans run afoul. Due to mixing and application mistakes, faulty materials, poor planning, or just bad luck, it is always possible that something can go wrong and negatively impact the color on a project. With something as fundamental as integral color, your first instinct may be to tear out and start again. Fortunately, that’s seldom necessary.

The Fair Cares

The Fair Cares

Of all the exhibitors at the Decorative Concrete Fair, we’re most proud to have Concrete Cares joining us. Concrete Cares is “fighting cancer one yard at a time.” Concrete Cares, and founder Mike Murray, uses the skills and charity of the decorative concrete community to raise money for cancer research and supporting the families stricken with cancer.

The Contractor’s Guide to Using Integral Color

The Contractor’s Guide to Using Integral Color

Integral color can be of significant value when used correctly. As with any material or tool, it’s too easy to get the most out of integral color. By playing up to its strengths and designing around weaknesses, you can knock it out of the park on your next integral color job.

The Contractor’s Guide to Getting Good Color

The Contractor’s Guide to Getting Good Color

Colored concrete requires a little more attention to detail than uncolored flatwork. Many faults and blemishes that would otherwise go unnoticed become more prominent or problematic with colored concrete. For this reason, it is vital to maintain best practices when placing and finishing integrally colored concrete.

One Month Left - Register Now, Save 50%

One Month Left - Register Now, Save 50%

You’ve got exactly one month until the Decorative Concrete Fair! Register now to make sure you get the best value in decorative concrete training! Our special 50% off deal won’t last forever. Register online or via fax (see the registration form or click here for details) for half off the full registration price – that’s only $50!